Conserved: pheromone-controlled adaptive evolution

February 17, 2013 | James Kohl

Margaret McFall-Ngai “Living in a Microbial World: Deciphering the Molecular Language of Partnership

NIH Wednesday Afternoon Lecture 1/16/13

After an introduction by the current director of the NIH, who led the human genome project to its completion, this hour-long video helps to detail the new non “gene-centric” view of how animals and their microbes successfully co-evolve. “What is evolutionarily conserved is likely to be critical.” — McFall-Ngai (2013)


My comment: What’s critical to adaptive evolution is nutrient-dependent and pheromone-controlled.

What has no place in the context of adaptive evolution is the ridiculous random mutations theory. However, on 2/14/13 Jay Feierman, the moderator of the International Society for Human Ethology’s discussion group wrote: Why are you having to support the role of random gene mutation in natural selection? That is a “given.”

Others who think the role of random gene mutation in natural selection is a “given” need to educate themselves. Meanwhile, Feierman continues to irresponsibly disseminate misinformation outside the context of the basic principles of biology and levels of biological organization currently known to human ethologists who are typically able to integrate information from across disciplines.



James Vaughn Kohl

James Vaughn Kohl

James Vaughn Kohl was the first to accurately conceptualize human pheromones, and began presenting his findings to the scientific community in 1992. He continues to present to, and publish for, diverse scientific and lay audiences, while constantly monitoring the scientific presses for new information that is relevant to the development of his initial and ongoing conceptualization of human pheromones.