Explaining a good theory

February 28, 2012 | James Kohl

A theory that you can’t explain to a bartender is probably no damn good. ~ Ernest Rutherford, (1871-1937) As quoted in The Language of God (2006) by Francis Collins, p.60

Scientific fact: Chemicals associated with nutrition and food odors cause the development of food preferences.

Scientific theory: Chemicals associated with people and social odors cause the development of social preferences.

Scientific theory: Pheromones are social odors that cause animals to develop species specific preferences like mate preferences.

Scientific fact: Spices are associated with food odors that enhance the appeal of food.

Extending scientific facts established in studies of other animals to people: Pheromones are chemicals associated with socialization that enhance the appeal of most people. Scent of Eros™ products contain human pheromones that enhance the appeal of people.

Scientific fallacy: Visual, auditory, and tactile cues cause our animalistic attraction to other people.

Scientific fact: No evidence from any animal species suggests that anything other than odors can directly effect the hormone-driven development of preferences for food or other people. Other sensory input can only be associated with the olfactory/pheromonal cause of our preferences for food and our sexual preferences.

“…when viewed from the consistency of animal models and conditioned behaviors, food odors are obviously more important to food selection than is our visual perception of food. Animal models affirm that food odor makes food either appealing or unappealing. Animal models reaffirm that it is the pheromones of other animals that makes them either appealing or unappealing.” (Kohl, in press).



James Vaughn Kohl

James Vaughn Kohl

James Vaughn Kohl was the first to accurately conceptualize human pheromones, and began presenting his findings to the scientific community in 1992. He continues to present to, and publish for, diverse scientific and lay audiences, while constantly monitoring the scientific presses for new information that is relevant to the development of his initial and ongoing conceptualization of human pheromones.