Fish stories vs biological facts

August 25, 2013 | James Kohl

North Atlantic Killer Whales May Be Branching Into Two Species 2013-08-16 11:3

Excerpt 1: “Scientists have suggested that the orcas separated into distinct species because of what they chose to eat. In this scenario, fish-eaters would mate only with other fish-eaters, and mammal-eaters only with other mammal-eaters. Given enough time, the two populations would become genetically distinct and unable to reproduce.”

Excerpt 2:  “The scientists analyzed the samples’ isotopic ratios—a telltale chemical signature of what the animals ate during their lifetimes.”

Excerpt 3: Although two of the orca populations eat only fish, there was no genetic evidence that they have diverged from those that dine on seals

My comment: A telltale chemical signature of what the animals ate during their lifetime might also indicate how they signaled conspecifics that what they ate increased their reproductive fitness, presumably by epigenetic alterations in the thermodynamics of de novo olfactory receptor creation that enhance organism-level thermoregulation. If so, this is yet another example of nutrient-dependent changes in phenotypic expression.

Does anyone not know that nutrients are metabolized to pheromones, which control reproduction in species from microbes to man? How much longer might it be until everyone realizes there is no such thing as mutation-driven evolution? Adaptive evolution (i.e., the only type of biological evolution) is nutrient-dependent and pheromone-controlled. Duh! This is not just a “fish story” however, since whales are not just big fish.

For “fish stories,” people are better off looking at reports from evolutionary theorists that contain no indicators that species diversification is nutrient-dependent and pheromone-controlled.

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James Vaughn Kohl

James Vaughn Kohl

James Vaughn Kohl was the first to accurately conceptualize human pheromones, and began presenting his findings to the scientific community in 1992. He continues to present to, and publish for, diverse scientific and lay audiences, while constantly monitoring the scientific presses for new information that is relevant to the development of his initial and ongoing conceptualization of human pheromones.