Olfactory/pheromonal input, gonadotropic hormones, and behavior in insects and mammals

October 4, 2013 | James Kohl

Early manipulation of juvenile hormone has sexually dimorphic effects on mature adult behavior in Drosophila melanogaster  Hormones and Behavior, Volume 64, Issue 4, September 2013, Pages 589-597 Kathryn J. Argue, Amber J. Yun, Wendi S. Neckameyer

Excerpt: Our studies have revealed a sexually and temporally dimorphic role for JH in the modulation of sexually mature, centrally controlled behaviors in Drosophila. We have presented DA as a neuronal factor that can interact with JH in a complex mechanism in which the two potentially modulate levels of one another; this interaction is also sexually dimorphic. Similar mechanisms have been demonstrated in mammalian species, suggesting that this role for gonadotropic hormones and their neuronal interactions in the modulation of centrally controlled behaviors may be evolutionarily conserved across species.

My comment: I would be remiss if I did not again mention that all evidence of ecological, social, neurogenic, and socio-cognitive niche construction in all organisms from microbes to man has always indicated that “… this role for gonadotropic hormones and their neuronal interactions in the modulation of centrally controlled behaviors may be evolutionarily conserved across species.” Indeed, not only has the “…gonadotropic hormone control of  neuronal interactions in the modulation of centrally controlled behaviors…” always been indicated as an epigentically-effected link from olfactory/pheromonal input to invertebrate and vertebrate behavior, but there is a model that includes what has been known since 1996 about hormone-organized and hormone-activated invertebrate and vertebrate behavior, and the model extends what is known to hormone-organized and hormone-activated human behavior. See: Kohl (2013) “Nutrient-dependent/pheromone-controlled adaptive evolution: a model.”

Excerpt: “The honeybee model organism exemplifies what has been learned from the study of invertebrates (De Loof, Lindemans, Liu, De Groef, & Schoofs, 2012). This includes what has been learned about the epigenetic effects of nutrients and pheromones on juvenile hormone (JH). However, the molecular biology of cause and effect that is common to all species was left behind, and the epigenetic effects of human pheromones have not typically been considered in the same context as epigenetic effects of food odors and insect pheromones or the epigenetic effects of pheromones on other mammals.”

My comment: There is now evidence that the epigenetic effects of nutrients and pheromones on JH in Drosophila also links the molecular biology of olfactory/pheromonal cause and effect that is common to all species. However, this evidence does not leave behind what has been learned about the epigenetic effects of food odors and insect pheromones or the epigenetic effects of pheromones on other mammals. The extension across species from insects to mammals may make it easier for others to accept extension of the mammalian model to humans. However, they may need to suspend their ridiculous belief in mutation-driven evolution and begin to learn about and accept what is obviously nutrient-dependent pheromone-controlled adaptive evolution in every species on the planet.

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James Vaughn Kohl

James Vaughn Kohl

James Vaughn Kohl was the first to accurately conceptualize human pheromones, and began presenting his findings to the scientific community in 1992. He continues to present to, and publish for, diverse scientific and lay audiences, while constantly monitoring the scientific presses for new information that is relevant to the development of his initial and ongoing conceptualization of human pheromones.